How To Write Good Resume For Job Application

What do you understand by the word Resume

A resume is a written compilation of your education, work experience, credentials, and accomplishments that is used to apply for jobs. It is one of the most important pieces of any job application. A resume provides a summary of your education, work history, credentials, and other accomplishments and skills.

There are also optional sections including a resume objective and career summary statement. Resumes are the most common document requested of applicants in job applications.

A resume should be as concise as possible. Typically, a resume is one page long, although sometimes it can be as long as two pages. Often, resumes include bulleted lists to keep information concise. Resume come in a few types, including chronological, functional, and combination formats. Select a format that best fit the type of job you are applying for.

DEVELOPING YOUR RESUME

Developing a resume is a process. You might go through different drafts before hitting on one that effectively displays your skills and experience. Be mindful that the starter resume will be your foundation. When you apply for specific positions, you’ll tailor it to make sure you are highlighting the most important aspects.

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Though the task might seem overwhelming, once you get the hang of it, it’s fairly straightforward. We strongly recommend that you take the time to create your own format rather than turning to pre-packaged templates, which can lock you into a rigid form that may make it hard to showcase your experience in the best way. Further, templates can be difficult to adjust, update, or customize.

How To Write Good Resume For Job Application

Below are the necessary steps to consider when developing a resume:

1.     Itemize your skills and experience:

Start brainstorming and making notes. Write down every position you’ve had (paid or unpaid), organizations to which you’ve belonged, leadership positions, special projects you’ve initiated, honors or awards, languages you speak, computer skills, special interests or hobbies, travel, or anything else significant. Not all of these are likely to be included in your final version, but a running list of your skills and experience can help you craft and tailor a resume for any opportunity.

2.     Clarification of career goals and objectives:

Review the descriptions of internships or jobs that interest you. A great source is handshake where employers post thousands of internship and job opportunities and new ones are added daily. Reflect on what you’d like to do, possible career paths that interest you, or experiences you’d like to explore. Identify different skills and objectives among the postings that might match or complement yours.

3.     Think like the employer:

Think about what a hiring manager would look for in an intern or employee. Highlight which skills and qualifications might be required to be successful.

4.     Revisit your skills and experience list:

Think about the items that most closely relate to the type of internship or job you want. Which ones demonstrate the kinds of skills outlined in the posting? Now, select those items that highlight your experience and relate your qualifications to the position as you imagine it in the mind of the employer. Don’t screen out too much. Include major items even if they don’t seem immediately related. You now have the basic items for your resume.

Finally, organize your items into categories.

Categories could include highlighted qualifications, education, experience, skills, languages, and awards. If you want to emphasize your skills rather than positions held, you could organize your experience by skill sets; for example: writing/editing, design, technical, customer service, leadership. (If you think of additional items along the way, by all means add them.) Your aim is to highlight and present your skills and experience in a way that bolsters your candidacy for a particular position. Be specific and make the right conclusions easy to draw. Don’t expect the employer to read between the lines.

Note: While some countries have different standards, in the United States, it’s necessary not to include certain things on your resume such as: age, photos (unless requested), marital status, health, nationality or ethnicity, religion, salary requirements, and references. Some of these things might be gleaned from other information such as your activities and memberships. That’s okay, but don’t explicitly state something that could potentially be discriminatory information. It is also important to create two or more versions of your resume that could be used in different situations. This is a common practice to display different areas of expertise.

How To Write Good Resume For Job Application

CHOOSING A RESUME FORMAT

It is important for you to choose the right resume format. It determines how the recruiter or hiring manager will perceive you, and which professional attributes you will highlight. In order to choose the correct format, you should evaluate your career history and goals for the future of your career.

1.      CHRONOLOGICAL FORMAT

The chronological format is best for everyone who is on a traditional career path. If you have been in the same industry for most of your career and you are applying for another job within that industry, this is most likely the best option. This format is best suited if you have no major gaps in employment (six months or more is a good rule of thumb) and your work history shows growth or promotions.

This format is also widely preferred by recruiters and hiring managers because it lays out the job seeker’s experience in a clear, ordered manner. It is called chronological because this format lists experience and education in a reverse chronological order with the most recent first. For example, if you have your master’s degree, it should be listed above your bachelor’s degree since it happens most recently. Reverse chronological order makes it easy for the potential employer to see your highest level of achievement first.

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The chronological format accommodate most industries because it has a traditional, basic layout. It put a heavy focus on dates and growth in your career. More than the other types of resume formats, this format holds the job seeker’s employment history in high regard. It is also the most straight-forward, and therefore the easiest for the recruiter or hiring manager to digest. They will rarely take the time to hunt through a resume to find the information they are looking for.

CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME FORMAT

Name

Address

City, State, Zip

Telephone Number

Email Address

Qualifications/Summary/Profile/Highlights

• ____________________________________________________

• _____________________________________________________

• _____________________________________________________

Work/Professional Experience

Job Title, Company, Location, Dates

• Skills

• Accomplishments

• Abilities

Job Title, Company, Location, Dates

• Skills

• Accomplishments

• Abilities

Job Title, Company, Location, Dates

• Skills

• Accomplishments

• Abilities

Education

Degree Earned, Major Field, School, City, State (year of graduation optional) Training, Certifications

Other Qualifications/Experience

Certificates, Awards

Professional Memberships

Languages Spoken

Additional Skills

2.      FUNCTIONAL FORMAT

You should use the functional resume format if you are a new graduate or re-entry the workforce after taking time off. It is best for those with gaps in employment because it showcases your skills rather than employment history. It is also great if you are changing career paths since it highlight transferable skills.

The functional resume format is essentially the exact opposite of the chronological format. Rather than focusing on work history, this format focuses on the job seeker’s skills and accomplishments. If you have a traditional career path, the only reason you should consider the functional resume format is if you have ten or more years of work experience However, even then recruiters may see the functional resume and assume you are not as qualified.

The functional resume works best for the non-traditional career path because it caters for those who either have been out of the work force for a while or who have changed jobs frequently. It tries to cover the gaps in employment and highlights the job seeker’s best professional attributes.

FUNCTIONAL RESUME FORMAT

Name

Address

City, State, Zip

Telephone Number

Email Address

Qualifications/Summary/Profile/Highlights • ___________________________________________________________ • ___________________________________________________________ • ___________________________________________________________

Work/Professional Experience

Function (e.g., Project Management)

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

Function (e.g., Construction)

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

• Major Accomplishment/Skills/Abilities

Work/Professional Experience

Title, Company, Location, Dates

Title, Company, Location, Dates

Title, Company, Location, Dates

Education

Degree Earned, Major Field, School, City, State (year of graduation optional) Training, Certifications

Other Qualifications/Experience

Certificates, Awards Professional Memberships Additional Skills, e.g., Languages Spoken

3.      HYBRID FORMAT

Use the hybrid resume format if you have decent work experience but you have some notable gaps in employment. If you are a person whose skills majorly overweigh your work history, like a veteran entering the workforce, the hybrid resume is a great option. It helps diminish employment gaps and lack of work experience without hiding them.

The hybrid resume format is simply a functional resume with a brief employment history added. Skills and accomplishments are still listed first; the employment history follows. You need to reveal where you worked, when you worked, and what your job position was. While most employers might still prefer a chronological resume, this is a good alternative to the functional resume.

If you have any questions about how to Write Good Resume For Job Application, please use the comment box below.

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